The Wyoming Democratic Party announced they’ll be asking the Fremont County Attorney to investigate voting difficulties that were experienced on the Wind River Reservation for the 2018 elections.

Wyoming Democratic Party Chairman Joe Barbuto told the Casper Star-Tribune, “The freedom we have to cast a ballot is central to what it means to be an American. Any and all attempts to obstruct or deny that right should be taken seriously. Having a complete understanding of what happened in 2018 will help prevent similar events from occurring in future elections.”

According to the party, residents on the Wind River Indian Reservation reported difficulty voting in two different circumstances. A voter said that an employee at the County Clerk’s office allegedly were told by an employee they’d need a valid driver’s license to vote before the day of the election. Additionally, an incident was reported in which a volunteer at a polling station was reported to be asking voters to read an oath about election procedures, which Democrats said violated a state law.

The Casper-Star Tribune has more about these claims by clicking here. 

 

Fremont County Clerk Julie Freese responded to the allegations. Her full statement is pasted below and in bold.

Regarding the request from the State Democratic Party for the Fremont County Attorney to investigate the 2018 General Election from the state Democratic Party Fremont County Clerk Julie Freese responds:

Prior to General Election Day, it was brought to my attention by the local Democratic committee chairman that he had concerns regarding voter registration ID requirements.  I met with the chairman to discuss his issues and explain our required process.

During the absentee and early voting process, I was not aware of any voter who was denied the right to vote.  In fact, my deputies made extraordinary efforts to make sure that all eligible persons desiring to register and vote were allowed to do so.

On Election Day, the election was overseen by election judges and observed by poll watchers and the voters, and I received no complaints.  Had I received any complaints, I would have immediately investigated and remedied any inconsistency. Running a proper and fair election and assuring that all eligible persons are afforded the right to vote is a priority of the Fremont County Clerk.

As County Clerk, I am required to train approximately 300 election judges, who were all asked to follow the same procedures. I have confidence in my election judges, and believe none of them acted in a discriminatory manner.