The students are from the left: Jared Romero, Andrew Gallinger (in wheelchair), Annah Brown-Henderson, Amanda Galitz (kneeling), and Joe Fins.

“The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problem.” Mohandas Gandhi

(RIVERTON) — Students in Jane Dunkel Warren’s Introduction to Human Communication class at Central Wyoming College recently produced an anti-bullying radio PSA that is now making the rounds on YouTube.
“It was just so cool to watch how these students worked together, were always prepared with whatever I said they needed to have done, and their passion in accomplishing this task in which they had no experience,” Warren said.
The students who participated in the class are Jared Romero, Andrew Gallinger, Annah Brown-Henderson, Amanda Galitz, and Joe Fins. Warren said neither the students nor she had any experience with developing a PSA and she said the class didn’t have any sort of “budget” for such a project. Quite humbly, Warren said the production “is not what one would call “Hollywood quality” but I think it’s even more remarkable because it was made in spite of all these factors.” Except for the final editing, which was graciously done by CWC Broadcasting instructor John Gabrielson, every single thing was done by these five students, she said.Warren said one student went way out on a limb to seek support for the project. “Rawlins student Joe Fins contacted the band Red Jumpsuit Apparatus to get copyright permission to use their music. In reply, he not only received copyright confirmation, but also a “VIP” backstage pass for an October 28th RJA concert in Laramie,” she said.  “We were all hesitant about the “validity” of the pass, but at around 12:45 a.m. on October 29th, I received a call from one very happy Joe Fins saying he met the band, they were ‘very cool’, and in his possession was a recorded endorsement from RJA lead singer, Ronnie Winter, for our PSA.”

Why do such a project?

The Communications Professor said the student’s project was sparked by a tragic event. “They wanted to do something when they heard about a local kid who killed himself. The indication was that he was victim of bullying,” Warren said. “I’m really proud of my students.”

Warren said youth suicide and bullying statistics are what she termed “horrifying” and the reason for making a PSA with this subject “is too devastating to imagine, yet each year we have the honor of educating (and vice versa) students who do projects such as this – who want to make a difference – try to right the wrong. They are amazing. We’re doing the right the thing – and that gives me hope,” she said.